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WHERE GREEN
THUMB GOES
HAND IN HAND
WITH GREAT CARE.

Whether it’s a California native garden with blue eyed grass or a winding path with boxwood hedges—Renew combines environmental science with rich landscape design that’s inspired by nature. We plan in unison with sunlight direction and existing surrounds, using a variety of textures and colors creating resilient landscapes that thrive with minimal care. Take the time to get to know us, your plants will be happy you did.

We Bring Nature Home

Located in Bixby Knolls, CA
(562) 424-8273

ABOUT

WHERE GREEN THUMB GOES HAND IN HAND WITH GREAT CARE.

Whether it’s a California native garden with blue-eyed grass or a winding path with boxwood hedges, RENEW combines environmental science with rich landscape design that’s inspired by nature.  We plan in unison with sunlight direction and existing surroundings, using a variety of textures and colors to create resilient landscapes that thrive with minimal care.  Take the time to get to know us, your plants will be happy you did.

NATURAL PHILOSOPHY.
HOLISTIC APPROACH. ORGANIC STANDARDS.

When you combine great garden design, integrated pest management, and proper horticultural techniques free of harmful chemicals, you’ll grow a healthy, long-lasting landscape.  You can spot the difference right away, because every time we care for garden, we leave behind a door hanger describing what services were performed.

“WE BRING NATURE HOME.”

Laurence Watt, Groundskeeper


I’ve been enthusiastic about ornamental horticulture since the late sixties.

As a small boy, my favorite memories were working in my grandfather’s garden in Palos Verdes. Not your typical house garden, this landscape was as diverse as it was magical. Set into the side of a hill, it was etched with stairways and terraces, and populated with all manner of interesting bugs, amphibians and reptiles. This playground served as a core formative experience for the way I look at landscape now. Several microclimates were available - enabling what Grandpa referred to as pocket gardens - to be placed throughout the property, and he used inexpensive recycled materials, such as broken concrete pavement, old rail timbers and gravel to make paths to connect them. Regular watering was reserved for flower beds and the prized dichondra courtyard but the rest of the area was left to fend for itself with only occasional hand-watering, pruning and weeding needed. I still hear him reminding me to pull weeds out by hand, making sure to remove their roots, rather than giving them ‘haircuts’ with a hoe.

When the time came for college, landscape architecture seemed an obvious career choice. I also briefly explored a fine arts education but always felt ‘cooped up’ being indoors for so many hours. The landscape program was the right fit. A little bit of know-how combined with some artistry and moderate physical labor achieved some pretty incredible results. Unfortunately, a year and a half into the program, the “Tech Boom” occurred and like many other young men with family plans, earning potential from the tech industry proved too hard to resist, so I changed majors.

Over the next couple decades, computer work provided a good living but was never very satisfying. I had always found more joy working with my landscape and helping others with theirs. My home library evolved in a predominantly horticultural direction and most of my vacation plans focus on which garden visits can be worked into the itinerary. At some point, it seemed a good idea to turn that energy into a vocation.

Laurence Watt

“A GARDEN IS AN INVESTMENT IN HEALTH.”

Shelby Batalla, Landscape Designer


Over the last decade, Shelby has created a portfolio of work that combines sophisticated landscape architecture with sustainable ecological systems. Her innovative designs bring unity and cohesion to places where people live, work, and play. From restoration ecology to environmental planning, Shelby is working diligently to construct models of biodiversity with best environmental landscape practices. For her, it’s all about working with nature, and not against it. Shelby is well versed in the field of architecture and has a deep understanding of its history, landscape design, and fine art. She has a BA from Trinity College, a masters from Rhode Island School of Design, and was the recipient of the American Society of Landscape Architecture Graduate Merit Award for her thesis. Recently, she was awarded a Placemaking Grant from Downtown Long Beach Associates and a Micro Grant from the Arts Council for her ‘Precious Cargo’ solar-powered urban furniture and public art installation.

Shelby Batalla